Sculpture & Glassblowing

Whether you’re a novice or an experienced artist, the Sculpture Workshops will take you on an exciting journey of discovery in a variety of media. Learn technique, process, tools and methods in the practical and creative aspects of three-dimensional art.

Courses - All programs below are open for enrollment unless indicated.

Introduction to Glassblowing

Ramson Lomatewama
June 9 – 14

Explore the fundamentals of working with hot glass, guided by a seasoned glass artist. Get familiar with holding and using the equipment and tools required to create glass art. Then begin creating your own work, beginning with solid pieces such as flowers, mushrooms, and paperweights, before advancing to blow simple vessels. Using colored glass, you will experiment with gathering and shaping hot glass into a variety of forms. Although the goal is to blow glass, advancement will depend on how quickly you become proficient at working the glass. Returning students can explore more advanced techniques. The small class size allows for maximum time working with glass and hands-on, close instruction. At times, the temperature in a hot shop can exceed 120⁰F. Drink plenty of water! Your pieces made on Friday will be ready to unload from the kiln at 9 a.m. on Saturday morning.

Skill Level: All levels, no glassblowing experience required. Safety requires that students are able to stay focused for long stretches of time, and have good eyesight (corrective lenses fine).
Tuition: $965
Lab fee: $75, includes frit/colored glass, clear glass, use of all tools and supplies, propane; you may be asked to bring additional materials.
Materials List: Download Here
Enrollment limited to 4 students

Ramson Lomatewama is a glass artist, kachina doll carver, poet and jeweler from Hotevilla, AZ, on the Hopi Reservation. He earned his BA from Goddard College in Plainfield, VT. Ramson has taught a wide range of workshops and courses in the US and Japan, and served as adjunct professor of sociology at North Central College in Naperville, IL. Although Hopi ceremonies and cultural activities play a major role in his life, Ramson continues to dedicate time to schools, universities, and museums as a visiting scholar and artist.

Fun with Glass

Patrick Morrissey
June 17 – 21

Our focus and emphasis will be on design and working towards a better grasp of the motions of glass working. Glass can be formed into one of two things, an abstract shape or a utilitarian object. You will decide which path to choose, and collaborate day by day on an idea and bring that idea to fruition. The nature of working in glass is collaborative, so working together will be key to our process.

Designed for beginning and intermediate glass students, we will explore a range of techniques to create sculptural and/or utilitarian items. You should expect to complete one to three pieces. Beginning students will learn the fundamentals of glass blowing and intermediate/returning students will learn new techniques as needed for their chosen design(s). The small class size allows for maximum time working with glass and hands-on, close instruction.

Skill level: All levels welcome, but some familiarity with glass blowing is helpful. For safety reasons, the ability to stay focused on the work at hand for long periods of time, and good eyesight (corrective lenses fine) are crucial.
Tuition: $925
Lab fee: $95, includes frit/colored glass, clear glass, use of all tools and supplies in class, propane; you may be asked to bring additional materials.
Materials List: Download Here
Enrollment limited to 4 people.

Patrick Morrissey is co-owner/operator of Prairie Dog Glass in Santa Fe, NM. He received his MA from So. Illinois University, Carbondale. Patrick has taught multiple times at Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina, Pilchuck Glass School in Washington, and at his own studio for 15 years. He currently teaches courses at the Institute of American Indian Art in Santa Fe.

The Intersection of Encaustic, Resin, 3D and Mold Making

Holly Wilson
June 24-28

It is the intersection of material, form and ideas that you will explore. Encaustic is the wax-based paint composed of beeswax, resin and pigment, which is kept liquid on a heated palette, and then applied to an absorbent surface. Learn to create fascinating structures that leave the two-dimensional plane. Come to this workshop with your own variety of materials including wood, cardboard, metal, clay, plaster, fiber, paper, objects from nature, or treasures you have held onto for way too many years. Experiment with how the materials may be dipped, painted, wired, glued, hammered, but most of all, waxed. You will be instructed in encaustic safety and start by making your own encaustic medium with pigment application. Learn fusing, transparency, glazing, layering, building up texture, line techniques, carving, image transfer, mold making, and resin application with different surfaces that can be achieved in resin. Create your own silicon molds and learn how to cast wax and quick setting liquid plastic. Returning students may work on advanced projects.

Skill Level: All levels
Tuition: $755
Lab Fee: $120, includes Encaustic wax, pigments, two wood panels, Rebound 25 Brushable, Smooth-Cast 300 Fast-setting bright white low viscosity liquid plastic, Artresin, use of propane torches, alcohol lamp, two metal tools. You will be  asked to bring additional materials.
Materials List: Coming Soon
Enrollment limited to 8 students

Holly Wilson is a contemporary multi-media artist with a BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute, MA and MFA from Stephen F. Austin State University, TX. Her works are in corporate, public, and museum collections throughout the US, as well as national and international private collections such as; Virginia Museum of Fine Art, C.N. Gorman Museum, Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, and Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art. Holly has exhibited her work at Crystal Bridges Museum of Art, IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Springfield Art Museum, Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian. She has received many awards, grants, and fellowships for her evocative sculptures, including a 2017 SWAIA Discovery Fellowship from the Santa Fe Indian Market and a 2015 Eiteljorg Fellowship. www.hollywilson.com

Small Things Matter, Wearable Art

Holly Wilson
July 1 – 5

Believe in the small things, create wearable art that makes the everyday matter and flicker with sterling silver and bronze. The work you create can be all unique pieces carved, built up or cast directly from nature. You will learn the process of “lost wax” casting – both gravity and centrifugal methods. This workshop will include an introduction to the materials, methods, and safety measures of casting, as well as how to produce and finish small sterling silver or bronze work. We will also be exploring the silicone mold-making process.

Skill Level: All levels
Tuition: $755
Attendance: You must attend all required instructional sessions to understand and follow safety guidelines.
Lab Fee: $130, includes wax, investment, sprue wax, shared use of patinas and sealing wax, silicon mold material, kiln, metal working tools such as flex shaft foredom, grinders or files, wax carving tools and small alcohol lamp, safety goggles and dust masks. You will be asked to bring additional materials. Precious metals will be available for purchase in class.
Materials List: Coming Soon
Enrollment limited to 8 students

Holly Wilson is a contemporary multi-media artist with a BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute, MA and MFA from Stephen F. Austin State University, TX. Her works are in corporate, public, and museum collections throughout the US, as well as national and international private collections such as; Virginia Museum of Fine Art, C.N. Gorman Museum, Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, and Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art. Holly has exhibited her work at Crystal Bridges Museum of Art, IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Springfield Art Museum, Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian. She has received many awards, grants, and fellowships for her evocative sculptures, including a 2017 SWAIA Discovery Fellowship from the Santa Fe Indian Market and a 2015 Eiteljorg Fellowship.

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