Jewelry & Metals Week

Through the Jewelry and Metals workshops you will find an exciting creative outlet in which to apply your individuality and ingenuity. The program includes Metals Week (six workshops), Native American Jewelry and more – all designed for a range of abilities and interests.

Registration for 2020 Metals Week and Jewelry Courses will open February 1st, 2020.
= Native American Arts

METALS WEEK

June 9–13 Coordinator: Deb Jemmott Spend a week in intensive metals studies with master metalsmiths. Maximize your creative artistic experience through workshops, lectures and demonstrations delivered by a team of six experts. You will work with one master instructor in an environment that encourages learning new techniques and creating work as well as networking with fellow jewelers and metalsmiths. Learn new skills, improve your techniques, and challenge yourself to grow as an artist. Lectures and demonstrations give you access to a variety of experts with different perspectives on metal and jewelry work. Small class size allows maximum, personalized interaction. Your week will also include:

  • Opening night faculty slide show
  • Faculty exhibit and reception
  • Two afternoon cross-over demo sessions with other Metals Week instructors
  • Potluck Dinner & Art Auction
  • Culmination exhibit of participant work

Steel and Gold

Bette Barnett
June 9-13

This is a comprehensive class that includes the basics of fusing gold to cold-rolled steel and will provide you all the information and skills needed to create dramatic steel and gold jewelry.

You will learn how to prepare gold alloys and the steel surface for the fusing process, how to fuse gold to steel with a torch, and how to apply Keum-Boo gold to the steel surface. You will begin with basic skills of cutting and forming the steel and continue by examining several texturing techniques before applying the gold to the steel surface. Applying gold to a textured surface adds additional dramatic effect to jewelry pieces. You will explore texturing techniques for steel including galvanic etching, hammer or chisel texturing, and roller printing. Bette will cover chemical and heat patination processes as well as sealing methods as possible finishes.

In addition to lectures, demos and descriptions, there will be a lot of hands-on time, providing students with broad opportunities to explore and experiment with all the techniques while obtaining instructor assistance.

Skill level: Basic jewelry making techniques including sawing, filing, soldering, sanding and finishing techniques required.
Tuition: $755
Lab fee: $50, includes alloy metals, mild steel sheet metal, patinas, a 1”x1/2” piece of keum-boo gold,  and the use of all tools, equipment, and consumables such as solder and compounds; you will be asked to bring additional supplies and tools.  Gold for fusing is NOT included in the kit and students are required to bring 2 pennyweight (dwt) of 24k gold casting grains.
Click here for Materials List
Enrollment is limited to 12 students

Bette Barnett has devoted her work since 2013 to exploring and experimenting with gold and steel jewelry. Bette studied with the late Chris Nelson, through his advanced workshops exploring ancient Japanese techniques. She has built on those studies by perfecting additional techniques and processes, including Keum Boo and galvanic etching of steel. She is developing techniques to fuse various alloys of gold and fine silver to steel. Bette participates in a number of annual art shows and her work is shown at Sparks Gallery in the Gaslamp District of San Diego. She teaches private lessons in her San Diego studio and offers group lessons throughout the US.

Alchemy: Electroforming for Enamellists

Kristina Glick
June 9-13

Looking for a new way to combine color and texture in your jewelry?  Look no further! This workshop will teach you how to combine the seductive colors of vitreous enamel with the organic textures of copper electroforming.  Whether you are a skilled enamelist or a total novice, electroforming can provide a down and dirty way of setting your enamels by growing protective yet decorative edge around your enamel. We will also explore the many ways sgraffito and electroforming can be combined to create textural design elements within the enamel itself. We will begin by learning various liquid enameling techniques including, dipping, pouring, brushing, sgraffito, layering, stoning, stamping, drawing, over and under firing. One of liquid enamel’s most amazing qualities is how it can be used to create very fine sgraffito drawings.  Those drawings in turn create a perfect base for electroforming. After creating a variety of enamels, we will dive into electroforming by learning how to make a tabletop electroformer appropriate for home studios. You will then learn how to electroform your enameled pieces as well as electroforming foil shapes with the purpose of making those shapes sturdy enough to enamel on. Other tips and tricks and related techniques will be covered as the week progresses.

Skill level: All levels, but basic metal sawing skills would be helpful.
Tuition: $755
Lab fee:$45, includes all electroformer components, liquid enamels, alundum stone, enamel containers, copper discs, copper tooling foil, and the use of all tools, equipment, and consumables such as solder and compounds; you will be asked to bring additional supplies and tools.
Click here for Materials List
Enrollment is limited to 12 students

Kristina Glick is a metalsmith and enamelist. She teaches at Idaho State University and leads workshops for craft schools and metalsmithing groups around the country. Her work has been exhibited in many national and international juried exhibitions and appears in various publications including 500 Enameled Objects and 500 Gemstone Jewels. Kristi has an MFA in Metal Design from East Carolina University. www.kristinaglick.com

Every Little Thing: Handmade Findings

Jo Haemer
June 9-13

It’s the details that can make or break a design. Have you ever seen a necklace that is so beautiful – with a cheap spring ring on the back that makes it look ordinary? Elevate your designs by personalizing your jewelry findings with custom pendant bails, clasps and earwires. Tired of your jewelry findings looking like everyone else’s? Make your work stand above and apart from others. You will learn how to make findings that reflect your style and that jewelry lovers will instantly recognize as your work. Included in class instruction will be the making of basic bails, snap bails and open and closing bails for your pendants as well as custom clasps for your chains and bracelets, and ways to   rapidly make multiple ear wires that are your personal design. In addition, we will cover soldering tips and tricks as well as advanced fabrication techniques and basic engineering of findings. You are encouraged to bring along any projects you are working on that need findings or designs for projects that would benefit from custom findings. Gems or beads that would benefit from custom findings and bezel stock or crowns for stones that you may want to incorporate in your projects could also be useful as inspiration for unique findings.

Skill level: Intermediate to advanced. Soldering and basic metalworking experience required.
Tuition: $755
Lab fee: $55, includes kit of sterling silver sheet, wire and tubing as required for specialized projects, and the use of all tools, equipment, and consumables such as solder and compounds. You will be asked to bring additional supplies and tools.
Click here for Materials List
Enrollment is limited to 12 students

Jo Haemer has a background in both fine arts and commercial jewelry making and over 49 years working in many facets of the jewelry world. She was a gender pioneer in the Jeweler’s Union and early founding member of the Creative Metal Arts Guild in Portland, OR. Jo is a former member of Rio Grande’s Advisory Board. Most recently she has been making high-end custom eyewear. She is a frequent contributor to the Ganoksin Orchid discussion group; has been featured in many issues of MJSA Journal; and has been a presenter at the MJSA Portland Jeweler’s Symposium.  She currently teaches in her studio and at Multnomah Arts Center in Portland. Her work has been shown in galleries all over the US and in shows at the University of Oregon’s fine arts museum. www.timothywgreen.com 

Traditional and Alternative Settings

Charity Hall
June 9-13

This class will focus on how to make traditional and alternative settings of all kinds for gemstones, enamels and found objects. Using sawing, soldering, texturing, riveting and forming, you will create one-of-a-kind pendants, rings, earrings or brooches that include custom settings to show off that special treasure. This class will include lectures and demonstrations of fabrication techniques needed to create unique frames, bezels, tabs, tube settings, prongs and endless variations of these settings. You will learn the skills needed to best show off your stones, enamels, unusual objects, or whatever you might want to include in your jewelry piece.

Skill level: All levels, but some basic fabrication skills in metal would be helpful.
Tuition: $755
Lab fee: $45, includes practice stones, sterling tubing and bezel wire, burs, copper wire, and the use of all tools, equipment, and consumables such as solder and compounds; you will be asked to bring additional supplies and tools.
Click here for Materials List
Enrollment is limited to 12 students

Charity Hall is a metalsmith in Blacksburg, VA and teaches adult workshops for guilds and schools around the country, including Arizona Designer Craftsmen, Penland, and the Center for Enamel Art. Her work is in the permanent collection of the Enamel Arts Foundation and also appears in many publications. Previously a botanist for the San Bernardino National Forest, she incorporates natural imagery in her work. She earned a BA in Biology at Colorado College, and an MFA in Metal Design at East Carolina University. www.charityhall.com

Mending: Collaborating with Broken Objects

Tom McCarthy
June 9-13

Do you have pieces that just don’t really work for you? It seemed like a good idea, but now it just sits in a drawer? How about a cherished item that is broken, dented, no longer fits or just needs some love…. Use your skills to reimagine these pieces and to transform them into new work.

We will discuss using traditional metalworking skills in non-traditional ways to return life to objects. This will add your  voice to the object while honoring its past.

Mending is not just repair. It is the use of brokenness to inspire and celebrate a new direction for an object. Rather than returning the piece to its original state, we will be giving it new life and returning it to function.

You are invited to bring anything they have, in any material, that needs some work whether it be broken, no longer fits, or is an object made in an earlier time that can be re-visited and reimagined.

Skill level: All levels, but some basic fabrication skills in metal would be helpful.
Tuition: $755
Lab fee: $40, includes some metals and tools that we will adapt, and the use of all tools, equipment, and consumables such as solder and compounds; you will be asked to bring additional supplies and tools.
Click here for Materials List
Enrollment is limited to 12 students

Tom McCarthy has been making jewelry for over thirty years.  He has an MFA from Southern Illinois University-Carbondale.  His work is in numerous private and public collections including the Mint Museum of Craft and Design in Charlotte, NC. Tom teaches workshops throughout the country and has contributed a chapter to The Penland Book of Jewelry, Lark Books.  In 2006 he was awarded a Fellowship in the Arts from the State of Florida. www.tommccarthyjewelry.com

If the Cuff Fits, Wear It

Susan Saul
June 9-13

Those wide… sexy… cuffs…… They are oh-so appealing as statement pieces (think Wonder Woman!) — but often aren’t so comfortable or easy to wear because they don’t fit properly. This workshop will guide you through the conception, layout and fabrication of your unique design and culminate in the forming and finishing of your cuff with the perfect fit! Topics covered will include measuring accurately, design layout, sawing, large scale soldering, texturing, forming, and finishing techniques and options. More advanced students will explore adding stones to curved surfaces. For even more adventure, gold and sterling bimetal embellishments are an option! You may work in sterling silver or jeweler’s brass – or a combination of both – to create your unique cuffs.

Skill level: All levels, but some basic fabrication skills in metal would be helpful.
Tuition: $755
Lab fee: $25, includes the use of all tools, equipment, and consumables such as solder and compounds; you will be asked to bring additional supplies and tools.
Click here for Materials List
Enrollment is limited to 12 students

Susan Saul spent many years as a visual artist working in printmaking, textiles, costume jewelry and large-scale paper and mixed media, before she “came home” to metalsmithing about 25 years ago. She has a BA in Fine Art from University of California, Santa Barbara. Susan teaches jewelry classes and workshops at the Spruill Center for the Arts in Dunwoody, GA, and taught at Penland and the Florida Society of Goldsmiths. She currently makes her jewelry in her one-person studio in Atlanta. www.susansauldesign or on Facebook – Susan Saul Design

Jewelry Courses
= Native American Arts

Hopi Jewelry: Overlay & Shadow Box

Roy Talahaftewa
June 17-21

Explore the classic Hopi overlay technique of metalsmithing, using multiple layers of sheet silver with cut-out designs, textured and oxidized recessed surfaces (You will also explore shadow box techniques and simple stone setting (cabochons) to incorporate into your work. Roy will demonstrate tufa casting techniques for adding elements to your overlay pieces. He will also show you how to make simple stamping tools. Close instruction means this workshop is well-suited for all levels of students.
Beginners: Learn the fundamental materials, processes, and techniques of silversmithing.
Intermediate/Advanced: If you have some experience, you will be able to fine-tune your skills while mastering new techniques and bench tricks.

Skill Level: All levels
Tuition: $755
Lab fee: $55, includes use of all tools, equipment and consumables such as solder and compounds. Some silver sheet and cabochons will be available for purchase in class; you will be asked to bring additional supplies and tools.
Click here for the Materials List
Enrollment limited to 12 students

Roy Talahaftewa (Hopi, Water Clan) is from Shungopovi Village in Arizona. He works in silver and gold, and uses Hopi overlay and tufa casting in his designs. Roy received the first major award for his work in 1981, and has earned Best of Show at the Heard Museum, among many others. Working with the nonprofit Hopi Pu’tavi Project, Roy teaches Hopi youth the art of metalsmithing, and he is an advocate and promoter of Hopi artists on the reservation.

Navajo Inlay Jewelry

Richard Tsosie
June 24-28

Working closely with Richard Tsosie, a leading contemporary Navajo jeweler, you will design patterns and create colorful collages in stone; then you will learn to use lapidary equipment to cut, grind and prepare stones to set into basic silver forms such as rings, bracelets, earrings and belt buckles which you will create. Safe use of the lapidary equipment will be covered. If you have no prior experience in metalsmithing, you will learn the basic techniques and concepts for shaping silver.

Skill Level: All levels, basic experience with silver is helpful.
Tuition: $755
Lab fee: $45, includes the use of all tools, equipment, and consumables such as solder and compounds. Additional charges will accrue for silver and stones used. Some stones will be available for purchase in class. You will be asked to bring additional supplies and tools.
Click here for Materials List
Enrollment limited to 10 students

Richard Tsosie (Navajo) is a jeweler and sculptor from Flagstaff and the Wide Ruins area of the Navajo Reservation and is currently living in Scottsdale, AZ. His work has been featured in American Indian Art Magazine, Arizona Highways, the video Beyond Tradition: Contemporary Indian Art and Its Evolution, as well as several books including Southwestern Indian Jewelry by Dexter Cirillo and Enduring Traditions, Art of the Navajo by Jerry Jacka. Richard’s work has been exhibited in galleries and museums from New York to California.

The Art of Mokume Gane

Anne Wolf
June 29-30

Mokume Gane is an ancient Japanese technique involving fused layers of differently colored metals that form unique organic patterns. This class begins at the patterning stage – we will be using fused mokume gane blanks (copper/brass). This allows us to focus on the most artistic part of mokume gane – unique and expressive pattern development. You will experiment with a variety of techniques, from stamping to direct hammering among others. You will try the different patterning methods, and on the second day you will focus on creating a finished piece using the patterned material – a pendant or pair of earrings, or more complex designs for the advanced student. We will cover the special considerations for fabricating and finishing mokume gane work, including soldering and patination. Even advanced jewelers/metalsmiths will benefit from learning these secrets of mokume gane patterning.

Skill Level: All levels, but some experience soldering and working with silver would be helpful.
Tuition: $370
Lab fee: $50, includes copper/brass mokume gane blanks, patination supplies, polishing cloths, and the use of shared tools and consumables in class. More exotic silver-containing combination metals will be available for purchase in class. You will be asked to bring additional supplies and tools.
Click here for Materials List
Enrollment limited to 10 students

Anne Wolf earned her MFA in Jewelry/Metals at San Diego State University. Based in San Diego,  she has been teaching jewelry/metals courses and workshops since 2003. Anne’s work has been shown across the US and in international locations such as Hanau, Germany and Tsubame, Japan. A self-proclaimed mokume gane geek, she has studied under Japanese metalwork masters such as Ford Hallam, Hiroko Sato-Pijanowski, and James Binnion. Her studio, Anneville Studio & Jewelry Lab, is San Diego’s newest jewelry co-working space. annevillestudio.com

Texture, Form and Construction

Deb Jemmott
July 1-5

So often we design on paper, cut from sheet metal, work on a flat surface, and view with close- up precision. It’s no wonder we end up with flat pieces. But there are difficulties working with dimensional pieces. How do you plan? How do you create dimension? How do you hold pieces that don’t fit well together while soldering? We will explore various ways to texture metal during the first part of the week. Texture can add a layer of visual interest and be a mechanism for expressing individuality when creating jewelry. It enriches surface and complements forms. Distinctive textures can be used to create contrasting surfaces, pattern sheet and wire, enhance dimension, and embellish forms with stunning results. We will explore a myriad of textures including hammer texture, stamping, roller printing, file texture, burr and grinding textures, and heat texture. Next, we will form the textured metal into dimensional shapes. Bending (simple and complex), sinking, and dapping will be some of the techniques we will use to create interesting dimensional forms. Metal’s full potential as a decorative material is not often realized until its malleability is exploited to create dimensional forms. Mid-week, we will incorporate soldering to join the textured forms. After covering the basics, we will learn how to solder two pieces that barely touch each other, pieces that are very large or very small, and how to solder very heavy metal to very thin metal. Designing in 3D will also be part of the weeklong experience. We will also cover the necessary technical information to use texture in jewelry to its fullest advantage – including finishing, patinas, and keum-boo. Most students will be able to finish several pieces of jewelry in addition to making many samples for future use. Skill Level: All levels welcome, but some basic fabrication skills in metal would be helpful.

Tuition: $755
Lab fee: $55, includes some metal and the use of specialized tools, as well as the use of all tools, equipment, and consumables such as solder and compounds. You will be asked to bring additional supplies and tools.
Click here for Materials List
Enrollment is limited to 12 students

Deb Jemmott has shared her love for metal by teaching jewelry making and metalsmithing to others since 1978, teaching through the San Diego Community College District in addition to many workshops. Deb’s belief that we all have artistic creativity combined with her mastery of jewelry making techniques is key to her nurturing the artistic creativity in each student as well as helping them achieve their ideas in metal. www.debjemmott.com

Additional workshops you may be interested in:

The Beaded Cuff Small Things Matter: Wearable Art

X